Leipzig Wildpark

One of our favorite weekend activities is walking to the Wildpark, a zoo/wildlife preserve for native animals in the southern part of Leipzig. The Wildpark is located within a stretch of forested park areas, and is always crowded with families. We especially like seeing the baby boar, raccoons* in trees, birds**, and albino reindeer. On one visit we arrived around feeding time, when the grey heron flew into the river otter enclosure to steal some fish, and the little mink ran around excitedly for twenty minutes before devouring his “prey.”

* raccoons are called Waschbär in German, which literally translates to “wash-bear.” I love this name for these mini-bears that wash their paws and food!

** including the European robin, which is much cuter than it’s North American counterpart

Washington Coast Winter

Last December after a winter storm, a friend and I drove out to Washington’s west coast. We went to Ruby Beach, one of my favorites of the Olympic National Park beaches. To my surprise, the storm hadn’t washed up much, but the trip didn’t disappoint, with beautiful grey skies and eagles overhead. And on our drive back, we came across a herd of elk occupying the Forks airstrip.

Baby Cheetahs

These young ones were hidden in the grass a little ways away from one of the areas we burned. Our hope is that the burned areas will attract lots of herbivores, which will in turn provide some tasty lunches for the cheetahs when they get a little bit older!

 

 

 

Game Drive

The only legal way to shoot wildlife in Kenya is from a car, with a camera. In the afternoons and evenings after the day’s fieldwork, we drove around to different parts of the reserve, stopping whenever we spotted something in the bushes, trees, or skies.

The diversity of wildlife here is mind-blowing. In just a few weeks, I’ve seen 34 different species of wild mammals, and more birds than I could begin to count. I’ve also gotten pretty good at taking pictures out of a truck window, aided by the best drive and tour guide imaginable (my advisor).

Kenya, Day 1

I was lucky enough to be invited to join my advisor on his 41st research trip to Kenya. For the next month I’ll be living at Mpala Research Center, helping with an experiment looking at the interaction between herbivory (by cattle or wildlife) and prescribed fires. We flew in to Nairobe late at night, and the next morning drove about four hours to the research station. The drive itself was incredible, seeing the change from drier lowlands to wetter uplands to dry again uplands–this time in the rain shadow of Mount Kenya, which remained shrouded by heavy clouds. I loved the alternating patches of farmland with towns, bright colored shops and roadside stands. The road itself boasted newer cars and Landrover-type safari vehicles, overburdened motorcycles and brightly colored buses with catchy shoutouts to Jesus painted on their sides.

The research station itself is incredible, with views looking out at the mountain range and an impressive diversity of wildlife. In just my first afternoon here I’ve seen eleven wild mammal species–zebra (Plains and Grevy’s), giraffe (reticulated), bush hyrax, warthog, dik dik, mongoose, bush baby, hare, vervet monkey, and bush buck–in addition to cattle, donkeys, sheep and goats. I wasn’t quick enough to get pictures of all of them, but I know there will be a lot more to see and many more opportunities! Our few hours in the field ended with thunderstorms in the distance and the setting sun lighting up the clouds over Mount Kenya.